Resuscitation

Optimal resuscitation is the application of positive pressure to inflate the lungs and achieve maximum alveolar recruitment – without causing further damage.

Safe, Consistent and Optimal Resuscitation

Protect with Controlled Pressures

Optimal resuscitation is the application of positive pressure to inflate the lungs and achieve maximum alveolar recruitment – without causing further damage (and while establishing Functional Residual Capacity (FRC)).

Infant T-Piece Resuscitation has the benefit of providing controlled and precise pressures to help prevent lung over-distension. These controlled pressures, Peak Inspiratory Pressure (PIP) and Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP), are delivered more accurately when compared with a self-inflating bag.

Elements of Resuscitation

An International Benchmark

All major resuscitation guidelines from around the world recommend the use of Infant T-Piece Resuscitation.

For more information on T-Piece Resuscitation, watch the videos of Professor Colin Morley talking about Key Elements of Resuscitation.

Benefits of Infant T-Piece Resuscitation

Infant Clinician
Inflates an infant’s lungs with controlled pressures1 The operators' experience, training, concentration and fatigue level do not affect the pressures delivered1, 2 which is highly reassuring for the clinician
Oxygen concentrations from 21 to 100% can be delivered3 PEEP can be used during surfactant delivery
Infant T-Piece Resuscitation with Optimal Humidity can prevent airway drying4 Can provide consistent PEEP during transport or ventilator circuit change
Consistent PEEP can improve lung compliance and establish FRC5,6 Initial sustained inflations can be delivered to establish lung volume6
  Can deliver ideal inspiratory versus expiratory ratio – allows for better gas exchange

 

T-Piece Resuscitation facilitates maximum oxygenation while protecting the lungs from injury.

During T-Piece Resuscitation, gases conditioned to body temperature, 37 °C, and fully saturated with 44 mg/L of water vapor, help to:

  • Protect the pulmonary epithelium and reduce postnatal decrease in temperature

  • Prevent infant moisture loss (especially during prolonged resuscitation)

  • Reduce the risk of an inflammatory response occurring in the infant’s airway caused by drying

  • Restore natural balance and provide a level of humidity found normally in the airways